Graduate Student Scholarship Recipients

The Institute is pleased to announce the following 2020-2021 Scholarship and Research Allowance Award Recipients:

Topic: Revamp and re-test the Prison Gambling Awareness and Prevention Program implemented in the Lethbridge Correctional Centre (2006).
Program: PhD (Health Sciences, U. of Lethbridge)
Supervisor: Dr. Robert Wood

Topic: My research project is an interdisciplinary inquiry of the political economy of gambling research. I unite the disciplines of political science and information science to study the role of the “grey literature” in informing gambling policy. Grey literature refers to credible research published outside of academic journals and books, such as in government reports.
Program: Master's (Political Science, U. of Alberta)
Supervisor: Dr. Fiona Nicoll

Topic: This study proposes to recruit individuals with gambling problems with Amazon’s Mechanical Turk (MTurk), a crowdsourcing platform, in order to validate a new screening measure for gambling disorder based on DSM-5 Gambling Disorder criteria.
Program: Program: Master's (Psychology, U. of Calgary)
Supervisor: Dr. David Hodgins

Topic: Investigating the transdiagnostic processes of treatment-seeking individuals with gambling disorder and substance use disorder.
Program: PhD (Psychology, U. of Calgary)
Supervisor: Dr. David Hodgins

Topic: This project will use rats as a model organism to test whether more impulsive individuals prefer reward delivered on a random-ratio (gambling-like) schedule vs a fixed schedule (reward delivered after a fixed number of responses). 
Program: Master's (Neuroscience, U. of Lethbridge)
Supervisor: Dr. David Euston

Topic: To evaluate how late-life events influence gambling among older adults, and examine if social support and coping behaviours mediate the link between stressful life-events and gambling.
Program: PhD (Clinical Psychology, U. of Calgary)
Supervisor: Dr. Candace Konnert

Topic: Using an animal model, increase our understanding of the role the brain plays in gambling addiction and ultimately lead to brain-based interventions which may help to both prevent and treat gambling addiction.
Program: PhD (Neuroscience, U. of Lethbridge)
Supervisor: Dr. David Euston

Topic: This project will involve surveying participants identified as primarily online, offline, or mixed-mode gamblers. The proposed study will examine the extent to which stigma surrounding problematic gambling impedes treatment-seeking behaviour within each of these groups. This type of research is very important for identifying psychological barriers that must be addressed in order to increase participation in effective treatment of disordered gambling.
Program: Master's (Psychology, U. of Calgary)
Supervisor: Dr. Daniel McGrath

Topic: A growing body of evidence suggests that risk-taking behaviour has domain-general components. Criminal activity, gambling, substance abuse, and risky sexual behaviours tend to co-occur within individuals. This proposed study will test whether archival measures of real gambling and driving behaviours will load onto this shared factor of risk propensity.
Program: PhD (Business, U. of Calgary)
Supervisor: Dr. Mehdi Mourali

Topic: Understanding the relationship between implicit memory associations and gambling behaviour longitudinally in both adolescents and adults.
Program: PhD (Psychology, U. of Lethbridge)
Supervisor: Dr. Robert Williams

Topic: The project will develop and test a model of the relationship between reward-related decision making, gambling-related cognitive distortions, and gambling severity using structural equation modeling.
Program: PhD (Psychology, U. of Calgary)
Supervisor: Dr. David Hodgins

Topic: What is the nature of the relationship between early traumatic experiences and addictive behaviours such as gambling and substance use in adolescents? What factors explain this link? What factors strengthen or weaken this relationship?
Program: PhD (Clinical Psychology, U. of Calgary)
Supervisor: Dr. David Hodgins

Topic: The project aims to understand the impact of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) on the development of multiple addictions, including drug and alcohol use disorders, and gaming and gambling disorders.
Program: Master's (Health Sciences, U. of Lethbridge)
Supervisor: Dr. James Sanders

Topic: This is a Foucauldian study of the concept of gambling addiction which utilizes his geneaological approach. Three research problems consider the "biopsychosocial model" of gambling addiction as an ideology which is a power effect of discourse.
Program: PhD (Cultural, Social & Political Thought, U. of Lethbridge)
Supervisor: Dr. Robert Wood