2020/2021

Major Grants

Lottery Winnings and Financial Wellbeing (#89)

Project Approved 2020-21

Dr. Barry Scholnick (Principal Investigator)
Alberta School of Business, University of Alberta
Google Scholar Profile

Description

This proposal examines whether a large (vs. small) lottery win has positive or negative financial impacts on the financial wellbeing of the winners. We will provide evidence on two contrasting hypotheses: (1) that a lottery win will allow the winner to pay down existing debt and improve their financial health; or (2), that a lottery win will create longer term financial harm for the winner because of subsequent overconsumption and/or financial mismanagement. We will provide evidence on these two hypotheses by linking lottery winner data, with data on the winner’s credit records provided by a Canadian Credit Bureau.

Timeframe: January 1, 2021 to December 31, 2024

The Alberta Gambling Research Institute provides grant funding to support peer-endorsed academic investigations into many aspects of gambling research. The contents, recommendations, and findings of the associated research reports, posted on this website, represent the views of the researcher(s).


Giwii-nisidopanmin odaminowin: Gambling and Videogames in the lives of Indigenous Youth in Northwestern Ontario (#90)

Project Approved 2020-21

Dr. Fiona Nicoll (Principal Investigator)
Department of Political Science, University of Alberta
Google Scholar Profile

Dr. Darrel Manitowabi (Co-Principal Investigator)
School of Northern and Community Studies, Laurentian University

 

Dr. Lori Haskell (Co-Principal Investigator)
Centre for Research on Violence Against Women and Children, University of Western Ontario

Dr. Kevin Harrigan (Co-Principal Investigator)
Stratford School of Interaction Design and Business, University of Waterloo

Description

Giwii-nisidopanmin odaminowin is a three-year intervention with Indigenous youth in Northwestern Ontario to generate academic knowledge about their current involvement in gambling and video gaming and the intersection of the two, as video gaming has been rapidly monetized through micropayments and lootboxes. Through the facilitation of IndigeSpheres to Empowerment, a federally incorporated Indigenous non-profit organization based in Thunder Bay, four academic researchers, an Indigenous youth mentor and three art and bodywork facilitators will conduct interdisciplinary research workshops focused on gambling and video gaming.  This research intervention will: produce new interdisciplinary knowledge of Indigenous video gaming and gambling within a youth-led and driven research program; facilitate Indigenous graduate training with academic experts on gambling and video gaming and trauma; equip Indigenous youth with mentoring to become lifelong learners, within and outside of formal education institutions; and, develop anti-racist practices of knowledge collaboration between youth leaders, researchers and facilitators racialised as Indigenous, black and white Canadians.

Timeframe: January 1, 2021 to December 31, 2023

The Alberta Gambling Research Institute provides grant funding to support peer-endorsed academic investigations into many aspects of gambling research. The contents, recommendations, and findings of the associated research reports, posted on this website, represent the views of the researcher(s).


Gambling in Canada in the Aftermath of the Pandemic (#91)

Project Approved 2020-21

Dr. Carrie Leonard (Principal Investigator)
Faculty of Health Sciences & Department of Psychology, University of Lethbridge
Google Scholar Profile

Dr. Robert J. Williams (Co-Principal Investigator)
Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge
Google Scholar Profile

Description

The GCAP project (Gambling in Canada in the Aftermath of the Pandemic project) is intended to follow-up with AGRI National Project (ANP) COVID Panel participants. A large stratified sample of approximately 3500 ANP COVID panel survey participants will be re-assessed on measures including gambling engagement; problem gambling; gambling harms; social demographic characteristics; psychological functioning; and COVID-19 infection history. This assessment period, in conjunction with ANP data, will allow for the longitudinal examination of fluctuations in land-based and online gambling and problem gambling at various stages of the pandemic: pre-pandemic, during lockdown, during early stages of re-opening, and late stages of reopening. Examining, for example, if gambling problems worsened due to migration to online during the lockdown or better due to the forced abstinence, and if those who migrated to online gambling continued to gamble online after re-opening of casinos or if these individuals returned to land-based only gambling.

Timeframe: May 1, 2021 to April 30, 2022

The Alberta Gambling Research Institute provides grant funding to support peer-endorsed academic investigations into many aspects of gambling research. The contents, recommendations, and findings of the associated research reports, posted on this website, represent the views of the researcher(s).